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Tips for Decluttering and Depersonalizing When You’re Selling a Home

The W Home Group / Housing  / Tips for Decluttering and Depersonalizing When You’re Selling a Home

Tips for Decluttering and Depersonalizing When You’re Selling a Home

So far for 2019, homes listed for sale have been on and off the market within about 68 days, according to statistics from ListWithClever.com. Of the conditions that allow such quick sales, some can be helped, whereas others cannot. If you’re planning on listing your home anytime soon, set yourself up for success by decluttering, depersonalizing, and staging your home. Your real estate agent is more than capable of helping with these tasks, but here are some ways you can take matters into your own hands, which will save you time and money.

Polish Up for Photos

Before your house is listed, you or your agent will hire a professional photographer to take listing pictures. While a pro knows how to edit some things out, you shouldn’t expect a photographer to spend hours getting rid of debris or clutter.

According to Unique Exposure Photography, today’s home buyers begin searching for a new place online, and the first impression needs to be a good one. To give your photos an inviting appeal, the first step is getting rid of clutter.

No one wants to see your dishes, dog bowls, or knick knacks in photos. The point to your pictures is to let buyers see the potential in a space. You don’t want them distracted by your junk. Since you’re already planning on moving, pack items you can do without until you reach your new home. If there are items you don’t want, go ahead and trash them or donate them to a local charity. Getting rid of your clutter, like magazines, duplicate items, and accessories, will save you time whenever you’re tidying up, doing a deep clean — which should be done before showing your home — and when you finally unpack in your new home.

The cost of a photographer depends on a number of factors ($170 to $250 on average), but you can make the photos better before a single photograph gets taken. While you’re decluttering, go ahead and start packing away your personal items as well.

Depersonalize Each and Every Room

While you declutter the home and pack the things up that you wish to keep, start packing your family photos as well. You want buyers to imagine their own lives in the home, rather than your and your family’s. It’s much easier for potential buyers to insert their own lives and furnishings into a space that’s neutral. That means your favorite monogrammed towels have to go.

Don’t leave the boxes lying around either. If at all possible, secure a storage unit to keep your belongings in while strangers view your home. Find a facility that you can pay for by the week or month, whatever works best for you. If you’re worried about the price, a unit in Timonium costs around $71 on average. Think of the benefits behind moving yourself out ahead of time and allowing others to “move-in” in their heads. You could even rent a unit that could fit your own furniture if you pay to stage your home professionally.

Dress Your Home for Success

With a clean canvas to work with, you can now stage your home in a way that shows off its impressive features and turns attention away from any flaws it may have. When staging the house, don’t be bold — be neutral. Just as you packed away anything that showcased your personality, get rid of any furniture or décor that screams personality. Paint over any accent walls with beige, white, or gray hues. Keep décor and furniture to a minimum.

According to Realtor.com, one of the biggest mistakes people can make when staging their home for photos and open houses is over designing. You want to give people just enough space to move around freely without bumping into things.

Don’t try to make a room look bigger by using smaller, impractical furnishings. Arrange the furniture in a way that naturally works with traffic. Think of how you come and go from a room, and whether something blocks that natural path. If it worked for you, it will also work for someone else. You have to give them an opportunity to see that.